Dental Education
Online Dental Education Dental education lectures and videos Online dental ce Dental education articles Expert dental educators Dental products education Dental Community
 
Dental Publication / Article Details

Anxiety and Ability to Recognize Clinical Information in Dentistry Anxiety and Ability to Recognize Clinical Information in Dentistry

Author(s):

Devorah Schwartz-Arad, DMD, PhD;Y. Bartal

Date Added:

6/11/2010


Summary:

Stress significantly affects a person's cognitive ability to process information. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients' ability to recognize information related to the procedure they are about to undergo will be affected by the stressfulness of the situation (less recognition under a high-stress situation as compared with a low-stress situation).Patients (n = 66) were evaluated for their ability to recognize clinical information supplied on two different occasions: immediately before oral surgery (high-stress condition) and before suture removal (low-stress condition). Dental and state of anxiety and expectation of pain were also assessed. On both occasions, the patients' ability to recognize information correctly was low (less than50%). Patients recognized significantly less information pre-operatively than before suture removal. State of anxiety, dental anxiety, and expectation to experience pain had a profound effect on their ability to recognize provided information correctly. Apparently, before dental treatment (high or low on stress), patients' ability to process information may be severely impaired.

Related Articles
Legal Considerations in the Use of Cone Beam Computer Tomography Imaging

Legal Considerations in the Use of Cone Beam Computer Tomography Imaging
Cone beam computed tomography imaging represents a paradigm shift for enhancing diagnosis and treatment planning. Questions regarding cone beam computed tomography's associated legal responsibility are addressed, including cone beam tomography necessity, recognition of pathosis in the scan's entire volume, adequate training, informed consent and/or refusal and current court status of cone bean computed tomography. Judicious selection and prudent use of cone beam computed tomography technology to protect and promote patient safety and efficacious treatment complies with the standard of care.

Author(s): Edwin J Zinman, DDS, JD;DDS, JD; Stuart C. White, DDS, PHD; Sotirios Tetradis, DDS, PHD
View Article>>
Ethics versus Legal Informed Consent— A Distinction with  Little Difference

Ethics versus Legal Informed Consent— A Distinction with Little Difference
The core principles of dental ethics and legal standards of care have similar foundations. Both are dedicated to place the patient’s best interest as primary and the practitioner’s interest as secondary. Similarities between ethics and the law demonstrate that most often there may be distinctions but little core differences. Informed consent principles illustrate the comparison between dental ethics and the law.

Author(s): Edwin J Zinman, DDS, JD
View Article>>
Download Now

Important!

To view this dental publication or article, you must be a registered user of Dental XP. If you are already a member, click here to login.

Registration is free and only takes several minutes. Dental XP will never spam you, or sell your information.

Join For Free





Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use
©2018

Preferred Language: English Flag
Contact Us · Login · Register