Dental Education
Online Dental Education Dental education lectures and videos Online dental ce Dental education articles Expert dental educators Dental products education Dental Community
 
Dental Publication / Article Details

Biologic Width Demystified Biologic Width Demystified

Author(s):

Richard Erickson, MS, DDS

Date Added:

1/1/2001


Summary:

Much fuss is justifiably made by many clinician speakers over violating the biologic width in crown margin placement. We've all seen seminar slides of chronically inflamed tissue around a crown in violation of this sacred region. But what exactly is this so-called biologic width? Why when despite your best efforts to esthetically hide a crown margin in the sulcus, it comes peeking back at you at the next prophy visit? John Kois answered these questions recently1 much more clearly than I have ever heard in a presentation and here are the highlights.

Some healthy dimensions of the gingival area are needed in order to compare to what is abnormal. As you can see on the diagram at left, a kind of symmetry exists in normal healthy gingiva: 1mm sulcular depth, 1mm attached epithelium and 1mm connective tissue before the crest of the bone is reached. This is the biologic width. 85% of healthy patients will exhibit this 3mm dimension, while 2% will be less than 3mm and 13% will be greater than 3mm. Also, the distance between the CEJ and the crest of bone is 2mm on average. When this CEJ to crestal bone distance is less than 2mm, the gingiva ride up the clinical crown making the tooth appear submerged and short. If the CEJ to crestal bone distance is greater than 2mm, the CEJ may be exposed and the tooth will appear too long.

To summarize then, the biologic width is equal to 3mm: 1mm sulcular depth, 1mm attachment epithelium and 1mm connective tissue above the crestal bone. This is true on the broad facial surface. In the proximal papillae area, the correct biologic width increases to 4mm. This can be measured on any tooth using the "sounding" technique.



Related Articles
Aesthetic Enhancement of Pontic Sites for Fixed Partial Dentures

Aesthetic Enhancement of Pontic Sites for Fixed Partial Dentures
An adequate alveolar bone base is the prerequisite for functional and aesthetically optimal reconstruction of the soft tissue architecture for a fixed partial denture pontic site or dental implant site. If the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the ridge deficiency are within 3 mm of their original contour, acceptable results can he achieved by soft tissue augmentation procedure only, ie, connective tissue grafts, onlay grafts, or an inlay rolled graft. These procedures are usually performed…

Author(s): Jack A. Hahn, DDS;Lee H. Silverstein, DDS, MS, FACD, FICD;David Kurtzman, DDS, Scott Harden, DMD, Peter C. Shatz, DDS
View Article>>
The "Hybrid Abutment": A New Design for Implant Cemented Restorations in the Esthetic Zones

The "Hybrid Abutment": A New Design for Implant Cemented Restorations in the Esthetic Zones
Cemented implant restorations are widely used by many dentists. The traditional abutment design resembles a natural tooth prepared for a crown with a similar taper and a chamfer finish line. A frequent complication associated with implant restorations in the esthetic zones is the recession of buccal gingiva over time. Abutment morphology, among several other prosthetic factors, may play an important role in the stability of gingival margin in esthetically sensitive areas, but this has never been thoroughly analyzed. With many considerations in mind and recent techniques released, this article proposes the "hybrid abutment: design (HAD), a new design that includes a combination of the two types of features - a feather edge on the buccal side, and a chamfer finish line on the lingual side. This article also presents a rationale for the use of different abutment designs for different situations.

Author(s): Roberto Cocchetto, MD, DDS; Luigi Canuello, DDS
View Article>>
Retrospective Analysis of 26 Complete-Arch Implant-Supported Monolithic Zirconia Prostheses with Feldspathic Porcelain Veneering Limited to the Facial Surface

Retrospective Analysis of 26 Complete-Arch Implant-Supported Monolithic Zirconia Prostheses with Feldspathic Porcelain Veneering Limited to the Facial Surface
The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical performances of 26 implant-supported, complete-arch, monolithic zirconia restorations with facial feldspathic porcelain veneers for the rehabilitation of completely edentulous patients. Eighteen patients were treated with a total of 26 complete-arch fixed prostheses. The mean follow-up time was 20.9 months. In total, 154 implants were placed supporting 309 retainers and pontics. The results of this retrospective evaluation showed that monolithic zirconia restorations with facial porcelain veneer provided satisfactory clinical performance and suggest that these rehabilitations are a viable treatment option for completely edentulous patients.

Author(s): Pietro Venezia, MD, DDS; Ferruccio Torsello, DDS, PhD; Raffaele Cavalcanti, DDS, PhD; and Salvatore D’Amato, MD, DDS
View Article>>
Related Videos
Comprehensive Esthetic Therapy in a Patient with an Intra-capsular Disorder - Part 1 of 2 Premium Member Content

Comprehensive Esthetic Therapy in a Patient with an Intra-capsular Disorder - Part 1 of 2
Dr. Rob Ritter discusses comprehensive esthetic work-up and treatment planning in the reconstruction of a patient with an existing intra-capsular disorder.

Presented By:: Robert G. Ritter, DMD
Presentation Style: Lecture
Community Rating:
 
Watch Now>>
The Interaction of Esthetics and Occlusion In Long Term Success - Part 2 Premium Member Content

The Interaction of Esthetics and Occlusion In Long Term Success - Part 2
Predictable longevity is achieved by a practical understanding of occlusal principles and a knowledge of how to manage the forces that exist in each individual patient and for the restorations that are envisioned.

Presented By:: Jimmy Eubank, DDS
Presentation Style: Lecture
Community Rating:
 
Watch Now>>
Occlusion Simplified - Clinical Techniques for Restoring Anterior Guidance and Opening Vertical Dimension - Part 1 of 3 Premium Member Content

Occlusion Simplified - Clinical Techniques for Restoring Anterior Guidance and Opening Vertical Dimension - Part 1 of 3
In this video, learn a practical system for restoring worn teeth, rebuilding anterior guidance, and increasing vertical dimension.

Presented By:: Corky Willhite, DDS
Presentation Style: Video
Community Rating:
 
Watch Now>>
Related Courses
Multidisciplinary Crowns & Bridges Premium Member Content

Multidisciplinary Crowns & Bridges
A 5 part course worth 1 CEU.

Presented By:: Pinhas Adar, MDT, CDT;Michael Sonick, DMD;Stephen J. Chu, DMD, MSD, CDT;Ernesto A. Lee, DMD
Presentation Style: Online Course
CE Hours: 1 CEU (Continuing Education Unit)
Watch Now>>
Excellence in Cosmetic Dentistry: Replicating Nature, When Nature Has Been Compromised Premium Member Content

Excellence in Cosmetic Dentistry: Replicating Nature, When Nature Has Been Compromised
Drs. Cherilyn Sheets and Jacinthe Paquett discuss the understanding of the art and science of dentistry to create restorations that duplicate nature.

Presented By:: Dr. Cherilyn Sheets
Presentation Style: Online Course
CE Hours: 3.5 CEU (Continuing Education Units)
Watch Now>>
Esthetic Case Design and Minimally Invasive Tooth Preparation: The Role of Magnification Premium Member Content

Esthetic Case Design and Minimally Invasive Tooth Preparation: The Role of Magnification
In this webinar, esthetic case planning and a new complete protocol of tooth preparation for full crowns will be highlighted utilizing modified enamel chisels and the dental microscope. Multimedia will be utilized for optimal visual learning using magnification photography and videos to focus on specific details required to improve your dental skills. The important role of magnification in dentistry will be further discussed.

Presented By:: Nazariy Mykhaylyuk, DMD
Presentation Style: Online Course
CE Hours: 1 CEU (Continuing Education Unit)
Watch Now>>
Download Now

Important!

To view this dental publication or article, you must be a registered user of Dental XP. If you are already a member, click here to login.

Registration is free and only takes several minutes. Dental XP will never spam you, or sell your information.

Join For Free



Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use
©2016

Preferred Language: English Flag
Contact Us · Login · Register