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Video Details
Modern Bone Augmentation Techniques: An Alternative Donor Site

Description:
In this lecture, Dr. Glickman will give the participants an alternative bone block harvesting site that is in the same area as the anterior maxillary teeth, eliminating the need for a second site surgery. This also provides a site that is painless and easily accesible therefore allowing the patients to have the gold standard of bone grafting rather than settling for treatment options with a more more variable outcome.

Date Added:
6/14/2013

Author(s):

Howard Gluckman, BDS, MChD Howard Gluckman, BDS, MChD
Dr Gluckman completed his dental training at the university of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg in 1990. After spending a number of years in a general practice he complete...
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Online Videos / Surgery / Bone Grafting / Modern Bone Augmentation Techniques: An Alternative Donor Site




Questions & Comments
Eric Pena - (12/24/2016 11:42 AM)

Thank you ! Interesting cases

yaarob sara - (9/5/2014 8:27 PM)

Amazing Presentation One problem though,,, you make it look extremely easy, I am sure it is not... Wonderful surgical skills Dr Howard

Howard Gluckman - (11/8/2013 3:43 PM)

A good question Mo. The bone is very stable as long as you have the minimum 2mm that is needed. I have also changed my technique a little in that I use the thin plates with autogenous bone chips harvested with the safe scraper. this means that you have a better vascularity of the bone which is more stable long term.

Maurice Salama - (7/1/2013 12:00 PM)

Howard; This is great stuff. Thoughts on this bone vs. other intra-oral sites when reviewing them AFTER Loading 1-2 years out? Maurice

Howard Gluckman - (6/30/2013 4:38 PM)

SOrry Charles He he. come over some time Ill let you pat them

Charles Schwimer - (6/20/2013 8:25 PM)

Howard, I was referring to your CATS :-).

Howard Gluckman - (6/20/2013 4:43 PM)

@ George Mcqeen. In the majority of the cases there is little or no loss of sensation of the anterior palate. THe only loss one gets is a slight tingling sensation of the incisive papillae. The majority of patients get used to this very quickly. With regards to haematoma inthe 200 or more cases we have done of this type of harvesting we have never experienced this at all. THe only time you get any bleeding is from the cutting of the palatal soft tissue with anterior releases. I have not had any issues with bone bleeds at all and all those who have done this technique since have shared the same experience. Perhaps the removal of the canines leaves a large hole in the palate which the removal of a bone block does not. Also to the best of my knowledge and in searching my anatomy books there is no anterior palatal artery that runs in the bone the only palatal aretry is the greater and lesser palatine arteries and neither is in the bone but rather runs in the palate within a canal and the nasopalatine duct. But I agree the palatal coverage is always good as it helps apply pressure to the area.

Howard Gluckman - (6/20/2013 4:27 PM)

@CHUCK. Thanks for the kinds words However there is nothing dangerous if it is well treatment planned and you use the correct tools. Keep well

George McQueen - (6/17/2013 10:25 PM)

Does not a premolar to premolar flap desensitize the anterior palate at least for several months?, and when the anterior palatine bone is cut, does one not get bone bleeders? I know when removing impacted canines, I have had to deal with the need to pack the site well due to intrabony hemorrhage from the anterior palatine artery. I agree with the use of a stent or denture to hold down the tissues after such a flap...certainly hematoma can occur.

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