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Video Details
Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) Protocol

Description:
Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) is an autologous fibrin membrane made by spinning down whole blood and harvesting the platelet and leukocyte containing fibrin fraction. Dr. Maurice Salama’s assistant, Charlene Bennett, will elaborate in detail describing the step-by step PRF preparation and how it can be utilized clinically.

Date Added:
2/7/2012

Author(s):
Charlene Bennett, CDA
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L-PRF

Online Videos / Surgery / Other Surgical / Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) Protocol




Questions & Comments
George McQueen - (11/10/2014 9:43 AM)

I just attended a workshop in Orlando where they did not cut the fibrin from the rest of the red clot....they simply brushed it off which left just a little red and gave a slightly larger membrane. Thanks for the presentation!!! Also, it was exciting to see how this is being used to help heal ulcers for diabetics etc.

sameh salama - (10/7/2014 7:40 AM)

i would like to inquire about the exact centrifugal force for L-PRF synthesis. in most papers it recommend about 400G however, if i'm not mistaken the process centrifuge in this video is close to the hettich EBA model and taking in prespective of the rotor radius and the 3000 rpm in the demo the centrifugal force is far from 400G. i would like to know if my hypothesis is right or not. thanks

Joseph Choukroun - (7/20/2014 3:43 PM)

Edward, A-PRF will give you more cells than PRF or L-PRF. definitely the presence of these white cells will improve the vasculrization.(synergy of the granulocytes and monocytes). White cells also produce BMP's..
Another interesting observation: the fibrin is less dense and indeed the cell penetration through the fibrin network is faster.. and then the tissue building is faster. Dr Choukroun

edward shapiro - (7/19/2014 8:39 AM)

Charlene. Thanks so much. Seems like a very easy system. I am debating between this and prgf. seems leukocytes are a good thing? How long between drawing blood and spinning. Intralock reps say 1 minute so if drawing 4-8 tubes do you spin for 1 minute first tubes and then spin rest so no coagulation. There are several centrifuges out there for this including Intralock, Dowel and Dr. C himself thru Blusky? Any difference. Also a newer A-prf protocol? is this different. thanks.

Oscar Guzman Sanchez - (6/18/2014 3:45 PM)

Hi, how warm the oven has to be? Also where can I buy these system? Thanks

Maurice Salama - (5/2/2014 6:50 PM)

Abdusalam; Yes, there are differences in the two protocols and procedures between PRGF and PRF. Look for the presentations on DentalXP by Drs. Anitua (PRGF) and Dr. Choukroun (PRF) to learn more. Dr. Salama

ABDUSALAM ALEMALI - (5/2/2014 12:03 PM)

thank u Dr. Salama on this summary my question is there a difference between PRF and PRGF in preparation protocol. thank you again

Maurice Salama - (1/30/2014 8:14 AM)

Kevin; I utilize the PRF always after being compressed in the box. Thanks Dr. Salama

kevin potocsky - (1/29/2014 11:17 AM)

dr. salama for sandwich prf around a collagen membrane over a bone graft, do you use the prf right after centrifuge, a little thicker, or do you use the prf after compressed in the box, thinner?

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