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Video Details
Ridge Splitting and/or GBR - Maxilla vs. Mandible - Part 1 of 2

Description:
Mandibular ridge splitting has been a clinical challenge due to high density of cortical bone. Therefore, some clinicians recommends two stage approach to overcome this issue. We will also present an unique ridge splitting technique that is easy to do and predictable using one stage approach.

Date Added:
7/9/2012

Author(s):

Samuel Lee, DDS Samuel Lee, DDS
Dr. Samuel Lee has earned double doctoral degree in Dentistry. He has earned Doctor of Medical Science (4-5 years full time doctoral degree) from Harvard Univ...
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Online Videos / Surgery / Bone Grafting / Ridge Splitting and/or GBR - Maxilla vs. Mandible - Part 1 of 2




Questions & Comments
John Carpenter - (9/2/2012 6:25 PM)

Excellent video! I have always split the maxilla and spread with osteotomes. This video removed a few barriers I had to splitting the mandible.

Andres Paraud - (8/10/2012 2:29 PM)

Dear dr Lee where its the continue of this great lecture? regards Andres Paraud

omid moghaddas - (7/29/2012 12:39 AM)

Tnx.Dear Dr Lee ,is it more predictable to do ridge splitting in mandible when we have broad base comparing to have parallel walls from crestal area to the apical?when you do the horizontal osteotomy ,the depth of should be similar to the height of the implant or more than that?will you do ridge splitting in posterior mandible with parallel walls and 3mm thickness or you prefer to do GBR or block grafts in these cases to reduce the risk of fracture?thanks again .

samuel lee - (7/28/2012 9:41 PM)

Dear Dr. Omid, thanks for watching the video! You are right that maxilla is more spongious and easier to split. But, due to concavity of apical region on pre maxilla, the angulation of implant becomes too buccal. Therefore, I recommend GBR on pre maxilla over ridge splitting. However, mandibular ridge is lingually inclined by 20 degree, so implant angulation is more favorable after ridge split. Thanks

omid moghaddas - (7/25/2012 2:40 PM)

i am agree in some part that ridge splitting is more predictable in mandible,but on the other hand ,there is more sponinuous bone available in maxilla so it can be more easily condensed with less risk of facture during spltting.please tell me if this belif is right.thanks so much for this perfect and comprehensive presentation Dr Lee

seyed ali mosalla nezhad - (7/23/2012 9:53 AM)

excellent video

Paul Scholl - (7/14/2012 6:40 PM)

Nice presentation with new technology.

Ronni Deniger - (7/11/2012 3:59 PM)

Excellent Video, Thanks!

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