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Periodontal Photo Essay Periodontal Photo Essay

Author(s):

Daniel J Melker, DDS

Date Added:

3/13/2012


Summary:

Dr. Daniel J. Melker presents a Periodontal Photo Essay. Question: Why do we barrel in furcations? Answer: By removing the overhanging lip on the furcation, we usually find bone to be more coronal in the furcation, creating a parabolic architecture and maintainable environment. No further breakdown should occur.

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