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Similarities Between an Acellular Alloderm and a Palatal Graft for Tissue Augmentation Similarities Between an Acellular Alloderm and a Palatal Graft for Tissue Augmentation

Author(s):

Lee H. Silverstein, DDS, MS, FACD, FICD;Russell A. Gornstein, DDS, MD, Donald P. Callan, DDS, Baldev Singh, BDS, PhD

Date Added:

3/1/1999


Summary:

Predictable tissue regeneration presents a considerable challenge in the surgical treatment of gingival tissue defects. Soft-tissue augmentation procedures to increase the existing or create a new zone of attached keratinized gingival tissue have classically been performed using the patient's own masticatory mucosa and, more recently, using an acellular dermal allograft as the donor material. This article presents a clinical case whereby an acellular dermal allograft was placed on the buccal surface of one mandibular cuspid while a masticatory mucosal graft taken from this patient was placed in a similar fashion on the contralateral mandibular cuspid. Soft-tissue biopsies were obtained from each grafted area 12 weeks after placement, at the time of light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation. This initial investigation demonstrated that the acellular dermal alloplastic graft material displayed clinical and histologic features that were similar to the patient's own palatal donor material when used to increase the zone of attached keratinized tissue.

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