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Video Details
Connective Tissue Attachment to Dental Implants - Pt 2

Description:
In the second part of this comprehensive series on peri-implant soft tissue relationships, Dr. Myron Nevins continues his comparison of soft tissue interfaces between teeth and implants. In addition, he describes the benefits of a direct connective tissue attachment to the neck of the implant and how that influences both surgical and biologic considerations such as implant positioning, bone response and long term maintenance.

Date Added:
11/12/2008

Author(s):

Myron Nevins, DDS Myron Nevins, DDS
Dr. Myron Nevins is an Associate Professor of Periodontology at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Clinical Professor of Periodontology at the Temple University Sch...
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Online Videos / Surgery / Implant / Connective Tissue Attachment to Dental Implants - Pt 2




Questions & Comments
Federico Moreno Sancho - (12/30/2010 1:27 PM)

I have quite a few questions related to that: 1- If you placed the autogenous tissue, the same would not migrate into the coronal fraction of the "filled" socket as it grows faster? 2- Would a combination of both have any sense?, obviously if you placed a membrane it will reduce the blood supply for the autogenous tissue but you will limit the space for your socket filled with Bio Oss, reducing soft tissue migration?. 3- Would it be better just to close with a membrane and connective tissue graft on implant placement?

Wleed Haq - (11/14/2008 1:26 AM)

How did you cover over the extraction sockets filled Bio-oss in your study - Membrane or autogenos tissue. If autogenous tissue what technique did you use? Thanks

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