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Video Details
Peri-Implant Treatment-Complications & Management

Description:
Various strategies for management of soft tissue failure at the implant site are presented & discussed, involving both soft tissue grafting & bone grafting.

Date Added:
3/31/2008

Author(s):

Abdelsalam Elaskary, BDS Abdelsalam Elaskary, BDS
Dr. Abdelsalam Elaskary is currently a visiting lecturer at University of New York, while maintaining a private practice limited to periodontics, dental implants and or...
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Online Videos / Surgery / Soft Tissue / Peri-Implant Treatment-Complications & Management




Questions & Comments
henry salama - (7/13/2014 9:31 AM)

the literature, as well as my personal experience, suggests that grafting may create a scaffold to support surrounding peri-implant hard and soft tissue, that may be visible on an x-ray, but rarely if ever, recreate osseointegration on exposed implant surfaces.

yaarob sara - (7/12/2014 10:18 PM)

Does grafting existing failing implants work? As shown in a case in the presentation...

Maurice Salama - (11/4/2010 6:20 PM)

Some very difficult case management issues to address often faced complications in implant dentistry. Well done. Dr. S

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