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Video Details
Utilizing Bioactive Modifiers

Description:
Dr. Salama takes you through the process of preparing and using Alloderm from LifeCell and Emdogain from Straumann.

Date Added:
6/29/2007

Author(s):

Maurice Salama, DMD Maurice Salama, DMD
Dr. Maurice A. Salama completed his undergraduate studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton in 1985, where he received his BS in Biology. Dr. Salama r...
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Questions & Comments
Maurice Salama - (3/29/2015 7:26 PM)

David; Good question. I am not sure why not. As for today, I would most likely use a similar approach but with a Tunnel Approach and PRGF/PRF instead. Thanks Dr. Salama

David Furnari - (3/29/2015 7:03 PM)

Maurice,
In the absence of PRP can the alloderm be used as a carrier for the emdogain (enamel matrix derivative)? question from
David Furnari ( DrDavidFurnari@gmail.com )

Osama Abdel Qader - (4/13/2014 2:42 PM)

nice technique... this was in 2007... means 7 yrs ago,,, so what do think about this technique now ?? u still use it ???

Hana Hasse - (5/27/2011 1:10 AM)

Dear Dr.Salama. Thank you for the great presentation. I got three questions for you. Is the complete submergence of the graft also necessary for palatal connective tissue grafts and if so - where is the root coverage effect beside the thickening of the tissue? Why do you generally prefer connective tissue grafts? Is there a greater risk of inflammation with allografts? Do you therefore always have to use PRGF? Don´t you risk the papilla with these flap designs. I wonder why the tunnel technique is not utilized in the other videos about alloderm as well - like Dr. Allen´s presentation. Best regards.

gabriel velasquez - (2/9/2010 6:56 PM)

Thank Dr. Maurice, is Emdogain a gel? and can I utilize with fibrine membrane (PRGF)?

gabriel velasquez - (2/9/2010 6:54 PM)

Thank Dr. Maurice, is Emdogain a gel? and utilize with fibrine membrane (PRGF)?

Tarek Ali - (7/18/2009 12:20 PM)

Thank you

Maurice Salama - (7/18/2009 7:11 AM)

Terek;
No difference in the way you suggest suturing and I prefer to trim the alloderm and any sharp edges. Most important not to have alloderm over vertical incision lines.

Tarek Ali - (7/18/2009 2:14 AM)

Hi Dr. Salama, thank you for the great video. I have two questions for you: 1. Would it make any difference if you were to secure the Alloderm individually first using something like 5-0 Vicryl first then coronally advance the flap to completely cover it ? 2. Is trimming the sharp edges of the Alloderm advantageous in any way or not ? Once again thank you and looking forward to your reply.

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